Aluminum is the most common metal found in nature. In the first six months of life, your baby receives about 4 mgs of aluminum if getting all of the recommended vaccines, compared with 120 mgs if your baby is fed soy-based infant formula.

What About the Aluminum in Vaccines?

Aluminum is a common and natural metal. Aluminum enhances the immune response to vaccines by allowing for lesser quantities of active ingredients and, in some cases, fewer doses. Here are the facts about aluminum:

Aluminum is the most common metal found in nature and is part of our daily environment. It exists in the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat. That’s why it was chosen for vaccines: our bodies already know how to process it and do so on a regular basis.

The amount of aluminum contained in vaccines is small. In the first six months of life, your baby receives about 4 milligrams of aluminum in getting all of the recommended vaccines. However, during the same period, your baby will ingest about 10 milligrams of aluminum if you breastfeed, 40 milligrams if you feed regular infant formula, and up to 120 milligrams if you feed soy-based infant formula.

Typically, your baby has between one and five nanograms (billionths of a gram) of aluminum in each milliliter of blood. Researchers have shown that, after vaccines are injected, the quantity of aluminum detectable in an infant’s blood does not change and that about half of the aluminum from vaccines is eliminated from the body within one day.

(Data from Vaccine Education Center, “Vaccine Ingredients: What You Should Know,”)